Bruce habla de Petty, Rolling Stone

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Bruce habla de Petty, Rolling Stone

Notapor borderline el 18 Oct 2017 20:02

"...it was nice to be alive in his lifetime." preciosa reflexión

http://www.rollingstone.com/music/featu ... nd-w509226


"I got the phone call and told the folks in my house," Bruce Springsteen says, recalling the sudden, shocking impact of that news. "There were shrieks of horror. You couldn't quite believe it. We were from the same generation of rock & rollers. We started around the same time and had a lot of the same influences. And when I lived in California, I got to know him quite well. He was just a lovely guy who loved rock & roll and came up thehard way."
"Tom was a great classicist," Springsteen says, "and the Heartbreakers were a real guitar band. The music was beautifully written, beautifully constructed. But Tom's attitude and personality gave it a modern edge."
Springsteen calls it "the debt" – the chance, if it comes, to honor a pivotal teacher and repay that gift of inspiration. "You know that without this guy and without that guy, there would be no you."
"It's sad that he's gone," Springsteen says of Petty, "but it was nice to be alive in his lifetime." And the work remains. "Good songs stay written. Good records stay made. They are always filled with the promise and hope and life essence of their creator.
"Tom made a lot of great music," Springsteen points out, "enough to carry people forward."





"Good songs stay written and records stay made..." ahí ha hecho un Rajoy...


...nunca discutas con un imbécil; te hará descender a su nivel y ahí te ganará por amplia experiencia...
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Re: Bruce habla de Petty, Rolling Stone

Notapor borderline el 18 Oct 2017 20:26

http://www.rollingstone.com/music/featu ... nd-w509226

Y especialmente recomendable esta parte del artículo, empezando por sus terribles dolores en su cadera maltrecha cuya operación dejó para cuando acabara la gira del 40 aniversario y evidentemente se fue con él..., dice el hijo de George Harrison que fue la segunda vez que vió a tantos hombre llorar desde que se fuera su padre, emotivo artículo para leer...


...nunca discutas con un imbécil; te hará descender a su nivel y ahí te ganará por amplia experiencia...
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Re: Bruce habla de Petty, Rolling Stone

Notapor Rising el 18 Oct 2017 22:18

borderline escribió:
"and the Heartbreakers were a real guitar band. ."


Algo que siempre he echado de menos en la ESB.

Me extraña un montón que no haya habido tributo a Petty en Broadway. ¿Está Bruce haciendo conciertos o representaciones teatrales siguiendo un guión pre-establecido e inmutable?
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Re: Bruce habla de Petty, Rolling Stone

Notapor borderline el 19 Oct 2017 13:46

http://www.rollingstone.com/music/featu ... ty-w508746

There is this feeling, especially with rock & roll artists of a certain, classic vintage, that as we grow up with them, they will always be there for us. The sudden shock of a leaving like Petty's cuts deep.

-Tom is my generation. We were from the same generation of rock & rollers. And so you feel very close to those guys. There's not that many of them that have survived. I felt a real kinship with Tom and the Heartbreakers. We started around the same time. We had a lot of the same influences. We took it in slightly different directions, but there were still so many places where we crossed over. He had a great band that he had for a very long time and a special relationship with [guitarist] Mike Campbell, like the very special relationships that I've had. And Mike produced Patti's first album [Rumble Doll, the 1993 solo debut by Springsteen's wife, Patti Scialfa].


You and Petty both came up through the hard graft of bar gigs and cover versions, figuring out how to write songs – what you wanted to express – from that experience.

-It was an old-school way that doesn't happen as much anymore. It lent you a certain kinship. When you met each other, you had a lot of the same experiences, a lot of the same disappointments, a lot of the same successes. And my recollection of the time I spent with him was very lovely. When we left California, I didn't see him as much. But when I did, it was like bumping into a long, lost brother. Patti and I – we were devastated. It's unimaginable, losing him.


How would you characterize the musical differences between you and Petty?


-Tom was a great classicist. He followed those forms pretty religiously. I veered slightly away from some of those things, into other things. But what was charming and exciting about the Heartbreakers was their formalism. It was kind of like the great bands of the Sixties, like the Beatles. It was a guitar band, something I envied very much. Because when we tried to push the guitars [in the E Street Band], it never quite worked for us. But they were a real guitar band.
And the music was beautifully written, beautifully constructed. He had an ear to the classics. But Tom's attitude and personality, his own vision, gave it a modern edge.



Petty had a unique connection to women in the way he wrote about them. He didn't idealize them; he told stories about them, grounded in a reality that his female fans recognized: "American Girl," "Refugee," "Listen to Her Heart."


-That was unique about what he did. It was an unusual way to go, and those were some of his most beautiful songs. "Here Comes My Girl" was one of my all-time favorites. Of course "American Girl," but also "Free Fallin'" – it's a song with a girl as the protagonist. He did something unique in that.



Petty once told me of a conversation he had with you at the time of his legal battles with his record company over "Damn the Torpedoes." He said you gave him some very encouraging advice. What was it?

-Well, I'd been through it [a reference to Springsteen's legal problems with a former manager in 1976–77, after the success of Born to Run]. I always knew one thing. They can take this away. They can take that away. They can't take your talent. They can't take the music. They can't take the fact that you can walk out onstage on any given night and light up the room. And isn't that the most valuable thing we have? It's the gift. The rest of the stuff is going to sort itself out. It might be painful at the moment. But it will take its course, and you will come out on top, because you've got the magic. They can't take the magic.



This is a push-comes-to-shove question: Do you have a favorite Tom Petty album?


-I liked the record he did with Jimmy [Iovine] back in the day, Damn the Torpedoes. But I like some of the offbeat things too. I like Southern Accents and Wildflowers. Patti loved Wildflowers. It was the gentleness of it. And that particular song ["Wildflowers"] was just beautiful. So we've got a lot of favorites.

Actually, Jimmy Iovine was something else you and Petty had in common. You made Darkness on the Edge of Town with Iovine. You and Petty often seemed like you were on parallel tracks, more than other artists of that era.


-I always felt that. We were always keeping an eye on one another.

Competitively? Genially ...

-Of course, genially – and competitively. [Laughs] That's musicians.


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